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Bermuda

Here we are in these numerous small islands that are Bermuda, waiting out the weather alongside the fleet of Tall Ships – anchored right next to the Pride of Baltimore! There must 10 or 12 massive old ships all anchored here in St. George’s. Very neat!

Toodle-oo! lies to anchor in St. George's

Toodle-oo! lies to anchor in St. George’s

Waiting for a blow to pass - in good company with the Pride of Baltimore

Waiting for a blow to pass – in good company with the Pride of Baltimore

We’ve been here 3 weeks now – a little longer than planned as there hasn’t been a suitable weather window to head out – so we’ve been enjoying ourselves, celebrating Bermuda Day in Hamilton, watching the America’s Cup preliminary races from aboard our friends Mindy and Reinhard’s boat ‘Rockhopper’, strolling around the island and visiting the Oceanographic research center here. All while trying not to spend too much money – it’s a bit of a stark contrast between Dominica, the Caribbean’s second most poor country to Bermuda, the world’s most expensive spot!

Swiss leading the Kiwis - for a while...

Swiss leading the Kiwis – for a while…

The USA Defenders

The USA Defenders

The British Hope!

The British Hope!

Still the weather here has been great – gone is the heat and humidity of the Caribbean – now if the weather between here and Newport would just cooperate!!!

Sailing!

We left Dominica on Sunday at 10:30am having finished up a few minor chores. David and Leanne on Perigee were planning to leave about the same time, but in the end had some hassles and didn’t get going until 3:00pm. We were actually sailing as a part of the Salty Dawg Spring Rally – though the bulk of the fleet was leaving from the British Virgin Islands and headed towards Virginia, however, 5 boats (including us) were planning to go to Bermuda.

Our plan was to head up the windward (east) side of Guadeloupe, but when we tried to sail across the top of Dominica, the wind was way too strong and in our face, so we took the easier route on the leeward side of the island. Now that we were out of the shadow of Dominica, the wind had come up to 25 knots – so we crossed to Guadeloupe with 2 reefs in the main and our small jib – still making over 8 knots of speed! The feared wind shadow of Guadeloupe didn’t materialize until half way up the island – and only lasted for a couple of hours, so motoring in calms was reduced to a minimum. With this success, we decided to make a B-Line for Bermuda – not divert to the windward side of any of the islands, so instead went between Monserrat and Antigua and cleared Barbuda within 24 hours of leaving Dominica. We were flying with an average speed in the first 24 hours of 7.0 knots!

The rest of the passage went really well – we had a predicted trof with no wind which lasted rather longer than we’d hoped for, but we managed to keep everything going for quite a while, using our code zero and our spinnaker (no, not at the same time!). The nights were very dark until the moon came up (not until past midnight) so for the most part, I took the night shift and Laurie took over once the moon had risen. (Got to be able to see those sea serpents coming!)

On the last day, the winds again dropped and it appeared that we would have little chance to get into Bermuda in the light, so we decided to sail – at about 3 knots! This slowed us to a morning arrival, but then the wind collapsed all together, leaving us either doing about 1 knot by sail, with sails slatting around all over the place, or taking down the sails and motoring with the engine hardly above idle – not good for the engine. So, in the end we decided to just go for it with the engine, and we ended up arriving in St. George’s at 10:40pm (11:40pm Bermuda time) on Saturday night and we actually cleared in at customs just after midnight.

The arrival into Bermuda was not simple – I had heard that it was easy, but it really wasn’t… Still, we managed to avoid all the unlit buoys and anchored boats and after clearing in, found ourselves a spot to anchor ourselves in the boondocks of the large bay. 6 and a half days – 1040 miles, average speed 6.67 knots. Not bad! Slept well! And now looking forward to discovering Bermuda properly. The last time we were here was 10 years ago – our first major passage aboard the Crealock… it’s good to be back – this time with much more time available. To make matters even more interesting, we’re here with a bunch of familiar boats – who arrived with the Salty Dawg rally. The 5 boats turned into 11 or 12 as several boats diverted away from the American coast due to bad weather in the gulf stream. It’s therefore shaping up to be an enjoyable stop!!

Unfortunately, we didn’t see a single green flash on the trip, though there were several beautiful sunsets. I have forgotten to mention in a previous post that when we sailed up from Grenada to Dominica, we watched a beautiful sunset which turned into a magnificent green flash – John Galpin should have been there to enjoy it!

Dominica Again

We had a rollicking sail to Dominica from Grenada – averaging 7.5knots over 27hours! This included a couple of hours at less than 4 knots, trying to avoid a squall.

We arrived in Roseau, capital of Dominica and enjoyed exploring the town.

A Roseau fixer-upper

A Roseau fixer-upper

Interesting streets

Interesting streets

We decided a hike was in order, so bought passes to do one of the segments of the Waitukubuli National Trail – a trail that goes from the most southern point to the most northern… 14 “Segments” make up the trail – each between 5 and 12 miles long and rated easy through impossible.

We took a bus to the start of section 4 – a Moderate trail through the mountains, but when we got there, we realized we were totally unprepared – since it was bucketing down and being high up, it was cold! We ended up taking the bus back to Roseau, and then took another to the southernmost point, Scott Head and proceeded to do section 1. And it was still bucketing down!

At the Start of Segment 1. The trial went over the hill in the background...

At the Start of Segment 1. The trial went over the hill in the background…

Disheartening sign...

Disheartening sign…

Steep Climb!

Steep Climb!

Laurie pushed us on and we climbed and climbed through the vegetation and after about 90 minutes of agony, came across a sign indicating that basically the trail was closed (the foot bridge over the ravine was destroyed. Agony! A not said that we should only proceed if we were highly trained hikers (we’re not!) so we prepared to turn back. Then Laurie spotted the rope – an aide to getting vertical to above the ravine – so rather than turn back, we took the hard route. It was steep! Very steep! But we made it and the trail suddenly opened up to a grassy plateau, site of an old coffee plantation. We continued up the trail – to the second ascent – and found a handy Gazebo where we took shelter from a torrential downpour!

We managed to get to the end of the section – which fortunately ended at a bus stop – with a little bar! A couple of beers went down a treat!

The following day we sailed north to Portsmouth where we had moored back in February and Laurie planned our next hike. This time along section 13. We took a bus to the start and then arranged for a taxi to pick us up. Timing got a little strained, so we had to really hoof it to make the taxi – which showed up just as we did! Driver Martin (Providence) gave us a little tour on the way back to Toodle-oo! along with a really good botany lesson!

Interesting vegetation!

Interesting vegetation!

Super Views

Super Views

Tomorrow we’ll have a go at part of section 11 – and then prepare Toodle-oo! for the trip to Bermuda. We’ve decided to leave from here – most likely on Sunday – rather than motor to St. Martin. Our Australian friends David and Leanne aboard Perigee (Leanne is the nurse that tended Kate’s shin while in Martinique) will leave at the same time as us – this will be Leanne’s first overnight trip – so why not make it 6 or 7 in one!

 

 

Final kick in the pants from Dominica – Section 11 was brutal! Up and down very steep hills – requiring help of rope in several spots. Got back absolutely exhausted! Great hike!

Neat Bridge

Neat Bridge

Prince Rupert Bay - Guadeloupe and Isles des Saints in the background

Prince Rupert Bay – Guadeloupe and Isles des Saints in the background

Saturns' Rings Fungus??

Saturns’ Rings Fungus??

Rope required!

Rope required!

Tough Descent

Tough Descent

Majestic forest

Majestic forest

Second kick in the pants arrived this morning at 3:00am with swells rocking us almost out of bed. Didn’t subside until late in the morning – so long walk with lack of sleep on top of it, just before we set off on a 7 – 8 day passage to Bermuda!!! Great!

Half Way

We’ve done a couple of really nice walks in Grenada – one in the south of the island up to Mt. William and the other in the north east, around the St. Antoine Rum Distillery – we got lost in the trails, but had a good walk – and yes, we did  indeed end up at the distillery and took a bottle home with us!

Bananas!

Bananas!

Tricky path with significant drop off to Starboard!

Tricky path with significant drop off to Starboard!

Now you don't!  The "Sensitive Plant" folds it's leaves up when you touch them...

Now you don’t!
The “Sensitive Plant” folds it’s leaves up when you touch them…

Now you see them...

Now you see them…

 

All good walks end at the pub - this one didn't serve food - but they did serve Fried Fish! Delicious!

All good walks end at the pub – this one didn’t serve food – but they did serve Fried Fish! Delicious!

This is the beginning of Rum - that grey/brown muck...

This is the beginning of Rum – that grey/brown muck…

Crushing Sugar Cane - I wonder how many feet and hands have gone through that roller?

Crushing Sugar Cane – I wonder how many feet and hands have gone through that roller?

Anyone want some compost?

Anyone want some compost?

Yesterday we did another Hash – it was very good fun, though not as interesting as the first one because it was in a more urban environment, so we were in and out of peoples gardens. Never-the-less, it was challenging and it was interesting to see Laurie’s competitive side in full view! She was NOT going to be last and was going to do whatever she could to get home first! It was therefore rather depressing to arrive back at the start/finish to find Bas and Agnes on TiSento already back – especially since those two are notorious for coming last! Turns out they got somewhat lost and ended up on the kiddies route – so that doesn’t count – Laurie’s pride restored!!

So, stealing a line from Tess on Ingomar… we’re half way! That is, since leaving Newport in September, we’ve come all the way south to Grenada and now we’re about to head back – though it probably (hopefully) won’t take quite as long!

St. George, Grenada

St. George, Grenada

We’ll probably leave Grenada (which we have really enjoyed) Wednesday or Thursday and head north – either to Antigua as a staging post or direct to Bermuda. It all depends on what the weatherman says we should do. Our DeLorme tracker will be active again so that anyone interested can check our progress here (once we’re underway).

https://share.delorme.com/Toodleoo

We’ll stay in in Bermuda for a couple of weeks – if there’s room for us (our visit coincides with the start of the Americas Cup events) – and then expect to be back in Newport around mid June… Fingers crossed…

 

 

 

A Hash and it’s Aftermath

A Hash is a beat through the wilderness on trails marked by ‘hares’ leaving shredded paper piles along the way. We did our first on Saturday in Grenada and it was a blast!!! So much so, we’ve decided to stay in Grenada another week so that we can do next week’s Hash! About 100 people showed up for this Hash – sometimes they have as many as 200 – and the majority are locals, but there’s always a few tourists – including a good contingent of Yoties amongst the crowd. Pics here of us receiving our instructions…

There’s a price to be paid for a Hash however – especially as ‘Virgins’ doing it for the first time – and that is that (for one reason or another…) you get absolutely filthy and smelly – so when we arrived back at the boat we had to strip off everything outside and Sunday morning turned into wash day.

What you get for finishing a Hash

What you get for finishing a Hash

Participants gather for the Hash start

Participants gather for the Hash start

Some may remember that Toodle-oo! is now equipped with a twin tub washing machine! Whoo-hooo! So, Laurie set to on Sunday morning washing our Hash gear. I took advantage of the effort to run our generator to make power for the wash, but also to make some water and to heat some water. All very boring, until the generator decided it’d had enough and coughed and spluttered to a halt.

Monday I looked at the generator and finally concluded that fuel was not getting to it – and my in-depth analysis showed that the lift pump which brings fuel from the tanks, through the primary filter and to the generator was not doing what it’s supposed to. So I pulled it off the wall and looked long and hard at it – and confirmed that indeed, it was not pumping. Fortunately, here in Prickly Bay, we have a ‘Budget Marine’ store, whose catalog (at least the 2016 version) shows they have the exactly correct lift pump… I dinghied over and sure enough, there it was! $250 later, the lift pump is installed, but the generator is still coughing and spluttering. Well, clearly, the fuel lines need to be bled… so for the first time in my life, I set about bleeding the system – turns out to be stupidly easy – one nut has to be cranked open a little bit and wait for air bubbles in the fuel to stop. Trouble is, air bubbles were definitely not stopping.

I decided that I must have installed the fittings to the pump incorrectly – and that air was getting in at the joints. So I went back to Budget Marine and purchased the right (yellow) kind of Teflon sealing tape (as opposed to the while plumbers sealing tape I’d used), disassembles and then reassembled everything. Nope… Still got air in the fuel (more like I have a little bit of fuel in my air…).

Laurie convinced me that a beer and a sit-down would help.

I sat. I drank. I drank some more. I had a thought. Dumb shit!

As soon as I turned to the supply of fuel from the empty port tank to the full starboard tank, the generator barked into action, ready for more charging, water heating and water making!

Anyone interested in a slightly used lift pump?

Great Day on Grenada

We had a super cruising day yesterday… We got going fairly early from Prickly Bay, catching a bus to St. Georges and then another up to the ‘Grand Etang” area and the trailhead for the hike up Mt. Qua Qua.

St. George's Harbour from the fort

St. George’s Harbour from the fort

The trail, which was well maintained, followed a mountain ridge around the volcanic lake, slowly windy it’s way up and down to Qua Qua. Quite a challenging walk with steep ascents and descents along the way. I also realized that we were right on the ridge when the vegetation thinned out some and we were perched up there will steep drop offs on both sides – making our trek up Helvelyn seem somewhat easy! Normally I’d suffer major vertigo, but the thick vegetation provided a sense of security – and I guess a grab hold should one miss-step. It was a very enjoyable walk up and back.

Mt. Qua Qua

Mt. Qua Qua

On our way...

On our way…

Nearly there!

Nearly there!

Sheesh! This is steep!

Sheesh! This is steep!

Steep drop on both sides all the way up!

Steep drop on both sides all the way up!

Made it!

Made it!

Best of all: there’s a bar at the trail head so we were able to enjoy a couple of beers on our return!

Later in the day, we took a taxi ride with a van full of other cruisers, clear across Grenada to the North East point, to one of the three sites in the world where Leatherback turtles come to lay their eggs… The description of the event was something like: ‘We’ll show you a turtle laying eggs, but we’re not sure when…” We arrived at the beach around 9:00pm and got lucky that by about 10:30 our group was allowed to walk along the beach to where a turtle had already started digging out her nest. As we walked in darkness, we could just make out another black blog coming out of the sea for her turn.

It was a fascinating scene. For one, I had no idea how large these creatures are – our missus was about 1300lbs, shell dimensions 169cm long, 130cm across the widest part of the ‘shell’ – with head and back flippers, she was probably 7ft long and later when we saw her front flippers, realize she had a ‘wing span’ of about 7ft! Her shell isn’t! It’s more like leather and moves with her movements and breathing.

It was a little disconcerting about how close we got to the animal while “researchers” took down her measurements and carefully managed the egg drop – one researcher was able to hold a back flipper out of the way for the other researcher to catch and place each egg in the nest – thus preventing breakage. Leatherbacks are very threatened and only one in 1000 little’uns manage to get to maturity. Anything they can do to change the odds is what they’re doing. We were able to watch the eggs being dropped into the nest.

After dropping her load, she then proceeds to smoosh the sand back in place and then pat it down with rear flippers. Then she starts moving sand with front flippers around to the back to completely fill in the hole, and then basically tramps all over the area before heading back down to the beach and out to the ocean. The whole process start to finish takes about 3 hours… She’ll be back in a couple of weeks to repeat the process. Apparently, she lays 50 – 150 eggs in each nest – some with yolks, some without (cushions) and then will repeat 5 or 6 times during the season…

Besides being massive, they’re pretty prehistoric looking! The head is somewhat grotesque and her mouth a jagged affair. As she’s smoothing all the sand back in place, you can hear her wheezing at the effort – can’t be easy for this mammoth who’s basically weightless in the ocean at all other times…

According to our guide, Leatherbacks can swim as deep as 4000ft, staying down for an hour or two before coming back to the surface for air. They must be able to dive faster than me!

Unfortunately, with light restricted to red only, I was unable to capture any photos. I also brought completely the wrong lens – since I thought we’d be miles away from the critters… As Laurie points out, rather weird that we’re able to get within a foot of this highly endangered species as she attempts to re-populate, but are held back 50 yards from the stones at Stonehenge!!!

To round out the day, we got a great view of the southern cross while watching our missus do her thing!

We were lucky in our timing – in that we were back in our boat by 1:30 am – some of the previous visitors were not back until dawn! Even so, with the good walk and late night, we’ve decided today is going to be an easy day!!!

The Grenadines

After Bequia, we sailed down to the Tobago Cays, a group of 4 little uninhabited islands with a large reef, protecting them from the Atlantic swells. Many boats were anchored right behind the reef – but we decided to stay behind one of the islands, seeking shelter from the boisterous wind.

We snorkeled around one of the small islands, but the current was pretty significant and it was a little murky in most places. When we finally came into some clear water with interesting coral and fish, we were too tired to really enjoy it! So we drifted back to the dinghy and took a ride out to the reef where we had an absolute blast in crystal clear water, swimming around small (house plot sized) coral beds. The diversity of fish was great.

On our way back to Toodle-oo!, we saw turtles, so in we get again and went snorkeling with turtles. They are really nice animals, though I gather they are far more bad tempered than they were letting on to us. They graze on the sparse grass growing in the sandy bottom, then come up for a breather every so often. Very neat. Unfortunately, I’ve been unable so far to reduce the size of my video files to fit in the blog – probably need to make a link to a U-Tube page, but have not worked out how to do that yet!!! (Update: Maybe I have – check out previous post…)

We then sailed around to Chatham Bay on Union Island where we found Ti Sento and Nomad in the anchorage, so enjoyed happy hour in one of the beach bars with them. The following day we did a bit of a walk – that turned into a marathon day… We scrambled along a very overgrown path following our guide, Alex to the top of a hill that was too overgrown to get a decent view, and then walked down into Ashton where we had a tasty local lunch. We declined a bus ride back and walked back over the hill – with unfortunately Tom from Nomad suffering from heat stroke in the process. It was hot!

Goats Everywhere

Goats Everywhere

Chatham Harbour from the overgrown path

Chatham Harbour from the overgrown path

At the top of the hill our guide Alex takes a 'Breather'

At the top of the hill our guide Alex takes a ‘Breather’

On our way down to Ashton

On our way down to Ashton

Chatham Hbr. Toodle-oo! in the centre

Chatham Hbr. Toodle-oo! in the centre

Don't Shoot!

Don’t Shoot!

After Chatham, we moved to Clifton, still on Union, which turned out to be a hustle bustle little town and met up with three other OCC boats, Sundowner of Beauleigh, Altair and Rhythm – so we all enjoyed sundowners at Happy Island Bar – a bar built on a man-made island on the reef – made basically of Conk Shells! Had an excellent evening!

Happy Island Front to back: Laurie & Bill Sue and Howard (Sundowner) Charles and Francis (Altair) Zach and Mia (Rhythm)

Happy Island
Front to back:
Laurie & Bill
Sue and Howard (Sundowner)
Charles and Francis (Altair)
Zach and Mia (Rhythm)

Clifton. Happy Island is the last "House" on the reef.

Clifton. Happy Island is the last “House” on the reef.

After Union, we sailed down to Cariacou, just 20 miles south and spent a couple of days in Tyrrel Bay. It was nice not to be hustled by anyone, but we found the island to be a little tame. We’re wondering if we’re becoming island snobs!?

Hillsborough Bay, Cariacou

Hillsborough Bay, Cariacou

We then sailed down to Grenada, our southernmost destination for the year (just reached under 12 degrees north). We had a great sail, and then spent one night in St. David’s Harbour before moving on to the more popular Prickly Bay, where most of the cruisers hang out. Yesterday was Easter Sunday and Laurie out did herself with the best ever Massa and Biscourts(sp) – so we invited Ti Sento and Nomad over for Portuguese bread!

Initial Prep

Initial Prep

Second Rising

Second Rising

Wow! Best Ever!

Wow! Best Ever!

Happy Easter!

Happy Easter!

All was great until we got interrupted by a massive cockroach in the cockpit! We live in fear of getting an insect infestation and take serious precautions to try to prevent them – like no carboard comes aboard, feet and shoes washed in sea before entering, etc… Seeing this 3-inch roach was disquieting to say the least! We believe that he flew in – since we have seen no evidence of little roaches, but just in case, we decided to wash the cockpit out and remove and scrub all teak grates… Today we bought some powerful bug spray… can’t be too careful.

We’ll stay in Grenada a week or so and then begin our journey back north.

We’re thinking we might stop on the way up in Dominica where we can do some sorely missed walks due to Kate’s mishap and then Antigua where I hope to dive in English Harbour.

 

PS: Can someone tell me if the previous post’s videos are actually visible now???

Bequia

We left Martinique on the 23rd, heading for Bequia (pr something between Beck-Wee and Beck-Way!) – with recommendations from many cruisers about Bequia ringing in our ears. We broke the passage in two with an overnight stop in St. Lucia, but didn’t get off the boat (so no need to check in/out). The following morning we left early – 6:00am – with 90+ miles to go, we hoped we’d be able to get to Bequia in daylight. We left alongside a Catamaran ‘Savana’. Initially the winds were light so we motor sailed, but as we passed the Pitons at the southern end of St. Lucia, the wind grew and we were able to sail a rhumb line easily towards St. Vincent. Savana and Toodle-oo! had been motor sailing pretty close to one another, but as the winds slowly picked up and we turned engines off, they pulled away from us… until the winds filled to over 15knots – at which point we were faster than them! We’ve got ourselves a boat race!

Spiky Mountains of St. Lucia

Spiky Mountains of St. Lucia

As close as we got to St. Vincent

As close as we got to St. Vincent

We came up to St. Vincent still close together and I fully expected the winds to die, but they stayed up and we were able to continue sailing in the lee of St. Vincent – an island we’d been advised to stay clear of for security reasons. Pity as it looked rather like Dominica in the northern part of the island. The wind had dropped some, so Savana was now well ahead, but again, as we came to the south end of St. V. it picked up again – with gusto! The south end of St. V didn’t look so appealing – much more habitation (like Martinique) so we were glad of our plan to bypass.

Sailing on to Bequia required a tightening of our heading and a current was flowing in Bequia Sound that was significantly adverse, requiring an even tighter heading – we were close hauled. The wind came up to a solid 15 – 18 with a few gusts to 22 and 25, but we maintained full sail and went for it! Savana was way off to our leeward side, such that we suspected they were headed elsewhere, but as we approached the island they tacked – now well behind Toodle-oo! Line honours to Toodle-oo!!!

After a couple of false attempts, we set the anchor in the north side of Admiralty Bay, at about 4:30pm – plenty of time to spare before the light failed.

In the morning, we checked into Bequia – and there was the crew of Savana. Unfortunately, they were French(!) so either didn’t want to talk with us – or couldn’t… (or were sulking!)

We took a Taxi Tour to get our bearings – it’s a nice island with a lovely feel. I can understand why people keep coming back here.

Admiralty Bay - Toodle-oo! tucked well off in the back right.

Admiralty Bay – Toodle-oo! tucked well off in the back right. Click to biggerize.

An Atlantic-side beach

An Atlantic-side beach

Back in Admiralty Bay, as we walked along a shore side path, I spotted a dive company and decided to look in to see how easy it would be to get my certification… 4 days later, here I am, a certified PADI Open Water Diver! Woo Hoo! Now I can spend lots of money on kit and then scrub the bottom of Toodle-oo! as my reward! During the training, we dived to over 50ft on coral reefs. Quite remarkable surroundings with colourful fish everywhere. On the final dive, I took my Go-Pro along for the ride – now all I need to do is work out how to make the files smaller so that I can link them to this blog for all to see.

We plan to stay in Bequia for a few more days before moving further into the Grenadines on our way down to Grenada, where Toodle-oo! will probably be hauled for some bottom paint and a general look-see.

All well aboard – we’re having a blast!

 

Martinique

We ended up staying in Martinique much longer than initially planned – and then added a couple more days to it when we heard of a planned walk up behind Le Marin. Turned out to be really enjoyable – certainly not a ‘Forced March’ – and offered lovely views over the harbors of Le Marin and St. Anne where Toodle-oo! is currently lying. We were accompanied by a French couple Patrick and Veronique and their dog Jacko and by German Leader of the walk, Andrea who is now resident (on her boat) in Martinique – though it sounds as if she’s sailed most of the world extensively…

Looking over Le Marin towards St. Anne

Looking over Le Marin towards St. Anne

View from the top

View from the top

This tree was cut down to it's trunk just 5 years ago - Things grow fast in Martinique!

This tree was cut down to it’s trunk just 5 years ago – Things grow fast in Martinique!

OK - this one didn't make it...

OK – this one didn’t make it…

We were also made aware of another walk – from St. Anne, so we stayed a second day and did a hike by ourselves of about 25km along the coast. It was very beautiful and we’re really glad we stopped to do it. Interestingly, on the south coast, the land is virtually desert – though unfortunately, I was unable to photograph it as it was raining!!! Other than the water from above, there was none to be seen – the land very barren with the occasional succulent struggling for a living…

Looking from St. Anne to Le Marin

Looking from St. Anne to Le Marin

Yet another Beach! THis one not of the nudist variety

Yet another Beach! THis one not of the nudist variety

Looks like Quick Draw McGraw (or Magoo!)

Looks like Quick Draw McGraw (or Magoo!)

Challenging stepping stones

Challenging stepping stones

Today we’ll head on towards Bequia via a short stop in St. Lucia…