Cruising is not all Fun and Games

So, we just spent 15 days at the top of a ladder in the parking lot where we gave Toodle-oo! some much needed TLC…

We arrived at New England Boatworks and immediately had Norm, their new Engine specialist, aboard Toodle-oo! to check out the state of the engine. He pulled all the injectors and they look good, ran a compression test – good, a leak test – found a small leak and fixed it – the engine passed it’s physical – we’re good to go.

The next day we were hauled out and the state of the bottom was to be expected… Toodle-oo! has been sluggish to say the least and not surprising since we haven’t even tried to clean the bottom since we were in Bermuda – and that was a half-hearted attempt at best. We were parked in the lot, just two boats away from sister ship Big Frisky – just one year younger than Toodle-oo! and also out for some general TLC. The difference was that they were paying to get their work done, we were here to do it all ourselves… It didn’t take me long to question our sanity!

Doesn't look too bad...

Doesn’t look too bad…

Until you get close!!

Until you get close!!

First job: Sand the bottom. It took three back breaking days to get the bottom looking like this – all the old layers of paint, some of which were showing a tendency to flake, were removed and I got her back down to very close to the barrier coat, ready for a fresh paint job which we did just before launching. This was going to take 4 gallons to do two coats – at $270/gallon, one wanted to make sure the prep job was good… After sanding the bottom, the next thing was to compound and wax the Topsides (which is a silly name because the Topsides are on the side of the boat – the hull from waterline up to coachroof – why did the nautical folk of yore decide there had to be a separate language for mariners?) – this was another awful job – especially since I’m incapable of using a buffer, so had to do the whole thing by hand, constantly reminded of Daniel – Wax on, Wax off…The end result has been quite satisfying however – and she’s now restored to her former glory.

Three days worth of sanding...

Three days worth of sanding…

All done!

All done!

Attention turned back to the engine – which has had sea water dripping down onto the turbo – so it looks like hell. Laurie went at it trying to remove as much of the rust by scraping, prying and sanding. I followed up with a chemical treatment and then set to with a Dremel tool – the tree approaches managing restore solid metal – which we then coated with Yanmar Grey – she looks like new! After that, I set to adjusting valve clearances – which brought me back to my Mini days – seemed I was always tinkering with those silly engines and this one looks remarkably similar!!

We also replaced our traveler system (here we go again – sure the whole boat is a traveler, but in this case, it refers to a movable point on which one can set the boom’s angle to the wind – it’s all about sail shape don’t you know) – the old one was pretty knackered – such that every now and again, a worn component would slip from one side of it’s housing to the other with a loud bang that from down below sounded like a shotgun going off. Of course, our traveler is obsolete, making replacement less than straightforward. However, with help of Phip from Rig Pro and John from Lewmar, we managed to get all the components so that once again we can be declared fit and well – at least as far as sail shape is concerned…

We got to end-for end the anchor chain. One tends to use the same 100ft or so, so after a while, it looks pretty naff and rusty while the other 2/3rds looks pristine. We have 275 ft of chain followed by another 250 ft of rope. This rope is really nice rope, but has been used perhaps twice when we were anchored in really deep stuff. It also happens to be the type of rope I’d like to use for our dock lines – so that we can get rid of the silly ones we have currently which are way way too thick and bulky… So, opportunity presents – we cut the good rope off and replaced it with a not so nice, but equally strong rope we had sitting around doing nowt. OK it doesn’t go into the rope well quite as nicely and when we finally need to use it I’ll be curing up a storm, but at least I’ll get to enjoy the nice rope as my new docklines. Back to the anchor chain… having freed the good line, we spliced the 3 strand nylon to the chain and full anchor rode is restored… Last thing we did was to repaint the chain – every 25ft there’s a colored section so that we know how much we’re letting out as we deploy the anchor.

Talking of deploying the anchor… you might remember some idiot leaving the sail locker hatch open and filling the darn thing with sea water as we approached Martinique… Well, it did a number on the Windlass. A windlass is not an out of breath girl from Yorkshire but is in fact another nautical term for the winch system used to deploy and retrieve the anchor and it’s ‘rode’ (there has to be a reason…). Anyway, said windlass was kaput. I had managed to botch it together to allow us to retrieve the anchor, but it was unable to deploy it – so instead I basically resorted to letting out the clutch and letting the anchor free fall… Since I do that fairly regularly anyway it worked fine as an interim solution, but getting the rebuilt unit back and installing a maze of spaghetti wiring will allow us to use the windlass once again with rather more finesse!

Our boat has a rub rail – finally a sensible nautical term – a rub rail is a rail that stands proud of the topsides and allows you rub up to a dock (god forbid someone else’s boat) without creaming the topsides… Ours has a nice stainless steel cap screwed on to give it extra flash – except several screws had rusted badly and were leaving streaks down the topsides. Others were broken entirely. We decided to remove the whole cap and replace all the screws (150!). Low and behold, when we got the sections of caps off it turned out they were all badly rusted themselves. Laurie gave them the whole metal polish treatment and then we remounted them – all looks in tip top shape!

We also got some other repairs done – to sails, cushions, sun screens, etc…

I also managed to service the winches – well actually 5 of the 6 winches we have – which reminds me I’ve one left to do – so I’d better get going and do it!

It’s great to be back in the water! I’m exhausted after this intense 2-week maintenance bash and really looking forward to getting back into relax mode!

More Dinghy Woes

On Monday, we dinghied in to Bristol Town dock and headed off to do some errands in a car we borrowed from Kat, followed by an interesting cup of coffee with Laurie’s cousin Valerie – which turned out to be a bottle of wine and some hors d’oeuvre instead! Unfortunately, when we returned to Bristol, there was no sight of our dinghy.

The dinghy is like our car – an essential piece of kit – and, as some may have read previously, in the last 12 months or so we’ve made a real saga out of it! We originally had a 10ft Rib with 15HP Yamaha engine which we decided was not the correct vehicle for our chosen cruising itinerary. We sold it and purchased instead, a rigid sailing dinghy which lasted one weekend! It was way too small and unstable so we sold it and bought instead a non-sailing rigid dinghy with an outboard. This was nearly as bad, with very little carrying capacity and a very wet ride. We got rid of that and purchased a fully inflatable 8 ft dinghy – stability at last! Although the 2.5HP engine meant it was no rocket ship – which when we got down to the Caribbean we discovered to be rather a hindrance… so when we got to St. Maarten, we purchased a 10ft Rib with a 15HP Yamaha engine. Yep – full circle and back to the beginning with basically what we’d originally had – but after a whole heap of money had passed through our fingers. To then find the dinghy gone on Mondays was almost too much to bear.

I couldn’t believe the dinghy had been stolen so on Tuesday morning I pumped up our backup inflatable dinghy (yeah, we couldn’t bring ourselves to buy high sell low yet another dinghy – so now we had 2!) and rowed across Bristol Harbor. I went walkabout around the town dock… and there she was. Stuffed under a pier in Bristol Harbor. It was high tide and the engine was just poking out one side of the pier and the tip of the boat was poking out the other side. She was full of water. There was no way to move her until the tide went down some.

I rowed back to Toodle-oo! and waited for the tide to drop. Then I rowed back (at least I’m getting some exercise out of this!), with a few tools in case the engine was compromised. The harbormaster had extricated her from the pier and it looked like damage was minimal. I pumped the boat dry and then tried the engine. Nada! Rats! I removed plugs, sprayed WD40 liberally, but couldn’t get her going…

I rowed back again (this was getting silly!) just to use the phone and arrange to get a ride to a local repair shop. I then rowed back again(!), got the engine off the dinghy and awaited Neal’s arrival. We took the engine to Don’s Marine and fortunately, within about 30 minutes of tinkering with her, the engine came to life! We decided to leave the engine there overnight while Don continued his magic, so Neal brought me back to the dock where I rowed yet again – this time towing the big dinghy across the harbor against a foul current!

It’s great to have the dinghy back and today we’ll probably have the engine back too – life without a car is miserable – just ask my shoulders!

Southern New England Cruise

The third running of the OCC’s ‘Southern New England Rally’ was a success – especially as we managed to pass management of the event to our good friends Peter and Patty on Serendipitous, and they did a super job. We ended up with 14 boats, about half of them foreign flagged. The cruise took us from Newport to Bristol then up Buzzards Bay to Woods Hole, across to Martha’s Vineyard and ending at Beverly Yacht Club in Marion over the course of 2 weeks. We had a great time with the varied group, enjoying dinghy drifts, beach barbecues, sunny and rainy-day games – and of course, plenty of sun-downers!

Dressed for July 4th

Dressed for July 4th

Boozy Raft-Up

Boozy Raft-Up

Now it’s time to take a little break from cruising and get Toodle-oo! back into tip-top condition so we ‘sailed’ her back to Bristol as a staging area before we head into New England Boatworks to spend altogether far too much money! Our “Sail” from Marion was mostly motoring (10 hours! – eugh!) and for a good portion we were in thick fog so watching AIS and Radar carefully. It was fortunate that we were vigilant as we came very close to having a head on collision with another boat on a reciprocal course – I threw the helm over and we missed ‘Adagio’ by about 10 feet!!! (Interesting tidbit: Toodle-oo!’s previous name was Adagio!)

We made it back and are now sitting on a friend’s mooring in Bristol, getting ready for the next few weeks of TLC…

Fire!

We stayed in Newport about a week and then daughter Abigail joined us and brought in tow her new Beau – Nick – who just happens to be a double Olympic swimming medalist… We had a great visit with them – and Abigail, recently licensed, decided to take me up in a plane as a birthday present… What a thrill to be flown, by your daughter, from New Bedford to Newport – and to circle Toodle-oo! who was sat at anchor in Newport Harbour. Great fun!

Toodle-oo! lying to anchor just off Ida Lewis Yacht Club

Toodle-oo! lying to anchor just off Ida Lewis Yacht Club

Captain and Copilot

Captain and Copilot

Newport Harbour

Newport Harbour

Sakonnet Point

Sakonnet Point

Boats are assembling for the the OCC’s Southern New England Cruise and we’ve had a lot of fun socializing with everyone, including a very nice evening at Ida Lewis Yacht Club with which the OCC has a reciprocal arrangement – I can’t for the life of me see how the OCC, a club with no home base, can possibly reciprocate – but there you go!

We sailed up to Bristol with Abs and NIck and used that as our home base for the next few days while I celebrated turning the horrendous 60!

Then… we went out for a day sail on the last night of their visit – planning to circumnavigate Prudence Island… we left in very light air but made good progress – right up until the wind filled in and we decided to tighten the halyard some – which we normally do when tacking through and the sail is unloaded and we manage the tack with the autopilot… All went well with raising it – but when I disengaged the autopilot I found the rudder to be locked solid! This resulted in our first Pan-Pan radio call – alerting other traffic that we were disabled and unable to maneuver. As it turned out, I was able to disconnect the autopilot and free up steering quite quickly and we could cancel the Pan-Pan – though the coast guard took some convincing!

We sailed on and the next thing that occurs is that one of our primary winches started screaming at us – the plastic feeder arm seems to have worn to a level that it makes a devilish noise when pulling a line in fast. This sail was not going to plan so we turned around and headed towards Potter’s Cove for lunch and to take a break… No sooner had we secured the anchor down, than Abs yelled out Fire! Fire! I ran back from the bow, into the salon to find the boat filling quickly with smoke. A quick peak into the engine compartment showed a small fire, so I grabbed an extinguisher and with Nick’s help, worked out how to use the damn thing and emptied it into the engine room. The small fire was out. It looked to be caused by the starter motor jamming on and building up excessive heat.

Fire

Remarkably calm and collected, we remained on the anchor to have lunch and a much needed beer and then sailed back to a mooring in Bristol – and promptly went out for sea food appetizers followed by an exceptionally good evening at Aiden’s – who had a new Irish band playing. Turns out Nick and Abigail are Irish music enthusiasts and Nick virtually took over the group’s musical agenda!

The boat is now fixed – new starter motor and repairs to wiring, autopilot sorted and even the fridge is working and we’re back down in Newport – “Dressed” – for the start of the Southern New England Cruise – whose first event starts in about an hour – so I’d better go shave!

Dressed and ready for action!

Dressed and ready for action!

Back in Newport

Arrived in Newport! Took 4 days 4 hours, but used all together far too many fossils as we negotiated a windless ridge for over 24 hours and then got hit with no wind heading into Newport (when there was supposed to be about 20 knots! Blah!

Uneventful trip otherwise – we got to use the entire inventory of sails, we dodged a really nasty looking line squall during the middle of the night – but it had thrilling lighting to watch! and we were visited by a nice pod of dolphins…

Visitors on passage!

Visitors on passage!

We then got boarded by the coast guard as we arrived in Newport – first time ever – apparently this is the new norm when coming into Newport. All OK they left happy. Then we went to Fort Adams to clear in with customs – and got to use the hose there while we waited and washed the entire boat down – nice!

It’s cold here! Feels like we’re heading into winter!

Misty morning

Misty morning

The Newport we know and love!

The Newport we know and love!

Bermuda

Here we are in these numerous small islands that are Bermuda, waiting out the weather alongside the fleet of Tall Ships – anchored right next to the Pride of Baltimore! There must 10 or 12 massive old ships all anchored here in St. George’s. Very neat!

Toodle-oo! lies to anchor in St. George's

Toodle-oo! lies to anchor in St. George’s

Waiting for a blow to pass - in good company with the Pride of Baltimore

Waiting for a blow to pass – in good company with the Pride of Baltimore

We’ve been here 3 weeks now – a little longer than planned as there hasn’t been a suitable weather window to head out – so we’ve been enjoying ourselves, celebrating Bermuda Day in Hamilton, watching the America’s Cup preliminary races from aboard our friends Mindy and Reinhard’s boat ‘Rockhopper’, strolling around the island and visiting the Oceanographic research center here. All while trying not to spend too much money – it’s a bit of a stark contrast between Dominica, the Caribbean’s second most poor country to Bermuda, the world’s most expensive spot!

Swiss leading the Kiwis - for a while...

Swiss leading the Kiwis – for a while…

The USA Defenders

The USA Defenders

The British Hope!

The British Hope!

Still the weather here has been great – gone is the heat and humidity of the Caribbean – now if the weather between here and Newport would just cooperate!!!

Sailing!

We left Dominica on Sunday at 10:30am having finished up a few minor chores. David and Leanne on Perigee were planning to leave about the same time, but in the end had some hassles and didn’t get going until 3:00pm. We were actually sailing as a part of the Salty Dawg Spring Rally – though the bulk of the fleet was leaving from the British Virgin Islands and headed towards Virginia, however, 5 boats (including us) were planning to go to Bermuda.

Our plan was to head up the windward (east) side of Guadeloupe, but when we tried to sail across the top of Dominica, the wind was way too strong and in our face, so we took the easier route on the leeward side of the island. Now that we were out of the shadow of Dominica, the wind had come up to 25 knots – so we crossed to Guadeloupe with 2 reefs in the main and our small jib – still making over 8 knots of speed! The feared wind shadow of Guadeloupe didn’t materialize until half way up the island – and only lasted for a couple of hours, so motoring in calms was reduced to a minimum. With this success, we decided to make a B-Line for Bermuda – not divert to the windward side of any of the islands, so instead went between Monserrat and Antigua and cleared Barbuda within 24 hours of leaving Dominica. We were flying with an average speed in the first 24 hours of 7.0 knots!

The rest of the passage went really well – we had a predicted trof with no wind which lasted rather longer than we’d hoped for, but we managed to keep everything going for quite a while, using our code zero and our spinnaker (no, not at the same time!). The nights were very dark until the moon came up (not until past midnight) so for the most part, I took the night shift and Laurie took over once the moon had risen. (Got to be able to see those sea serpents coming!)

On the last day, the winds again dropped and it appeared that we would have little chance to get into Bermuda in the light, so we decided to sail – at about 3 knots! This slowed us to a morning arrival, but then the wind collapsed all together, leaving us either doing about 1 knot by sail, with sails slatting around all over the place, or taking down the sails and motoring with the engine hardly above idle – not good for the engine. So, in the end we decided to just go for it with the engine, and we ended up arriving in St. George’s at 10:40pm (11:40pm Bermuda time) on Saturday night and we actually cleared in at customs just after midnight.

The arrival into Bermuda was not simple – I had heard that it was easy, but it really wasn’t… Still, we managed to avoid all the unlit buoys and anchored boats and after clearing in, found ourselves a spot to anchor ourselves in the boondocks of the large bay. 6 and a half days – 1040 miles, average speed 6.67 knots. Not bad! Slept well! And now looking forward to discovering Bermuda properly. The last time we were here was 10 years ago – our first major passage aboard the Crealock… it’s good to be back – this time with much more time available. To make matters even more interesting, we’re here with a bunch of familiar boats – who arrived with the Salty Dawg rally. The 5 boats turned into 11 or 12 as several boats diverted away from the American coast due to bad weather in the gulf stream. It’s therefore shaping up to be an enjoyable stop!!

Unfortunately, we didn’t see a single green flash on the trip, though there were several beautiful sunsets. I have forgotten to mention in a previous post that when we sailed up from Grenada to Dominica, we watched a beautiful sunset which turned into a magnificent green flash – John Galpin should have been there to enjoy it!

Dominica Again

We had a rollicking sail to Dominica from Grenada – averaging 7.5knots over 27hours! This included a couple of hours at less than 4 knots, trying to avoid a squall.

We arrived in Roseau, capital of Dominica and enjoyed exploring the town.

A Roseau fixer-upper

A Roseau fixer-upper

Interesting streets

Interesting streets

We decided a hike was in order, so bought passes to do one of the segments of the Waitukubuli National Trail – a trail that goes from the most southern point to the most northern… 14 “Segments” make up the trail – each between 5 and 12 miles long and rated easy through impossible.

We took a bus to the start of section 4 – a Moderate trail through the mountains, but when we got there, we realized we were totally unprepared – since it was bucketing down and being high up, it was cold! We ended up taking the bus back to Roseau, and then took another to the southernmost point, Scott Head and proceeded to do section 1. And it was still bucketing down!

At the Start of Segment 1. The trial went over the hill in the background...

At the Start of Segment 1. The trial went over the hill in the background…

Disheartening sign...

Disheartening sign…

Steep Climb!

Steep Climb!

Laurie pushed us on and we climbed and climbed through the vegetation and after about 90 minutes of agony, came across a sign indicating that basically the trail was closed (the foot bridge over the ravine was destroyed. Agony! A not said that we should only proceed if we were highly trained hikers (we’re not!) so we prepared to turn back. Then Laurie spotted the rope – an aide to getting vertical to above the ravine – so rather than turn back, we took the hard route. It was steep! Very steep! But we made it and the trail suddenly opened up to a grassy plateau, site of an old coffee plantation. We continued up the trail – to the second ascent – and found a handy Gazebo where we took shelter from a torrential downpour!

We managed to get to the end of the section – which fortunately ended at a bus stop – with a little bar! A couple of beers went down a treat!

The following day we sailed north to Portsmouth where we had moored back in February and Laurie planned our next hike. This time along section 13. We took a bus to the start and then arranged for a taxi to pick us up. Timing got a little strained, so we had to really hoof it to make the taxi – which showed up just as we did! Driver Martin (Providence) gave us a little tour on the way back to Toodle-oo! along with a really good botany lesson!

Interesting vegetation!

Interesting vegetation!

Super Views

Super Views

Tomorrow we’ll have a go at part of section 11 – and then prepare Toodle-oo! for the trip to Bermuda. We’ve decided to leave from here – most likely on Sunday – rather than motor to St. Martin. Our Australian friends David and Leanne aboard Perigee (Leanne is the nurse that tended Kate’s shin while in Martinique) will leave at the same time as us – this will be Leanne’s first overnight trip – so why not make it 6 or 7 in one!

 

 

Final kick in the pants from Dominica – Section 11 was brutal! Up and down very steep hills – requiring help of rope in several spots. Got back absolutely exhausted! Great hike!

Neat Bridge

Neat Bridge

Prince Rupert Bay - Guadeloupe and Isles des Saints in the background

Prince Rupert Bay – Guadeloupe and Isles des Saints in the background

Saturns' Rings Fungus??

Saturns’ Rings Fungus??

Rope required!

Rope required!

Tough Descent

Tough Descent

Majestic forest

Majestic forest

Second kick in the pants arrived this morning at 3:00am with swells rocking us almost out of bed. Didn’t subside until late in the morning – so long walk with lack of sleep on top of it, just before we set off on a 7 – 8 day passage to Bermuda!!! Great!

Half Way

We’ve done a couple of really nice walks in Grenada – one in the south of the island up to Mt. William and the other in the north east, around the St. Antoine Rum Distillery – we got lost in the trails, but had a good walk – and yes, we did  indeed end up at the distillery and took a bottle home with us!

Bananas!

Bananas!

Tricky path with significant drop off to Starboard!

Tricky path with significant drop off to Starboard!

Now you don't!  The "Sensitive Plant" folds it's leaves up when you touch them...

Now you don’t!
The “Sensitive Plant” folds it’s leaves up when you touch them…

Now you see them...

Now you see them…

 

All good walks end at the pub - this one didn't serve food - but they did serve Fried Fish! Delicious!

All good walks end at the pub – this one didn’t serve food – but they did serve Fried Fish! Delicious!

This is the beginning of Rum - that grey/brown muck...

This is the beginning of Rum – that grey/brown muck…

Crushing Sugar Cane - I wonder how many feet and hands have gone through that roller?

Crushing Sugar Cane – I wonder how many feet and hands have gone through that roller?

Anyone want some compost?

Anyone want some compost?

Yesterday we did another Hash – it was very good fun, though not as interesting as the first one because it was in a more urban environment, so we were in and out of peoples gardens. Never-the-less, it was challenging and it was interesting to see Laurie’s competitive side in full view! She was NOT going to be last and was going to do whatever she could to get home first! It was therefore rather depressing to arrive back at the start/finish to find Bas and Agnes on TiSento already back – especially since those two are notorious for coming last! Turns out they got somewhat lost and ended up on the kiddies route – so that doesn’t count – Laurie’s pride restored!!

So, stealing a line from Tess on Ingomar… we’re half way! That is, since leaving Newport in September, we’ve come all the way south to Grenada and now we’re about to head back – though it probably (hopefully) won’t take quite as long!

St. George, Grenada

St. George, Grenada

We’ll probably leave Grenada (which we have really enjoyed) Wednesday or Thursday and head north – either to Antigua as a staging post or direct to Bermuda. It all depends on what the weatherman says we should do. Our DeLorme tracker will be active again so that anyone interested can check our progress here (once we’re underway).

https://share.delorme.com/Toodleoo

We’ll stay in in Bermuda for a couple of weeks – if there’s room for us (our visit coincides with the start of the Americas Cup events) – and then expect to be back in Newport around mid June… Fingers crossed…

 

 

 

A Hash and it’s Aftermath

A Hash is a beat through the wilderness on trails marked by ‘hares’ leaving shredded paper piles along the way. We did our first on Saturday in Grenada and it was a blast!!! So much so, we’ve decided to stay in Grenada another week so that we can do next week’s Hash! About 100 people showed up for this Hash – sometimes they have as many as 200 – and the majority are locals, but there’s always a few tourists – including a good contingent of Yoties amongst the crowd. Pics here of us receiving our instructions…

There’s a price to be paid for a Hash however – especially as ‘Virgins’ doing it for the first time – and that is that (for one reason or another…) you get absolutely filthy and smelly – so when we arrived back at the boat we had to strip off everything outside and Sunday morning turned into wash day.

What you get for finishing a Hash

What you get for finishing a Hash

Participants gather for the Hash start

Participants gather for the Hash start

Some may remember that Toodle-oo! is now equipped with a twin tub washing machine! Whoo-hooo! So, Laurie set to on Sunday morning washing our Hash gear. I took advantage of the effort to run our generator to make power for the wash, but also to make some water and to heat some water. All very boring, until the generator decided it’d had enough and coughed and spluttered to a halt.

Monday I looked at the generator and finally concluded that fuel was not getting to it – and my in-depth analysis showed that the lift pump which brings fuel from the tanks, through the primary filter and to the generator was not doing what it’s supposed to. So I pulled it off the wall and looked long and hard at it – and confirmed that indeed, it was not pumping. Fortunately, here in Prickly Bay, we have a ‘Budget Marine’ store, whose catalog (at least the 2016 version) shows they have the exactly correct lift pump… I dinghied over and sure enough, there it was! $250 later, the lift pump is installed, but the generator is still coughing and spluttering. Well, clearly, the fuel lines need to be bled… so for the first time in my life, I set about bleeding the system – turns out to be stupidly easy – one nut has to be cranked open a little bit and wait for air bubbles in the fuel to stop. Trouble is, air bubbles were definitely not stopping.

I decided that I must have installed the fittings to the pump incorrectly – and that air was getting in at the joints. So I went back to Budget Marine and purchased the right (yellow) kind of Teflon sealing tape (as opposed to the while plumbers sealing tape I’d used), disassembles and then reassembled everything. Nope… Still got air in the fuel (more like I have a little bit of fuel in my air…).

Laurie convinced me that a beer and a sit-down would help.

I sat. I drank. I drank some more. I had a thought. Dumb shit!

As soon as I turned to the supply of fuel from the empty port tank to the full starboard tank, the generator barked into action, ready for more charging, water heating and water making!

Anyone interested in a slightly used lift pump?